Tag Archives: Wing

Building Seamaster Day 27: Covering Started!

Trailing Edge Covered

I had another hiatus from building and finally got back to it again on Sept. 28th which debuted covering of the aircraft!  That’s right I have finally got to the point where I can start covering.  I am planning on following a similar color scheme as my previous aircraft.

This session saw the start of covering the wing, specifically the trailing edge in green, seen above.  This involved measuring and cutting a few pieces of covering and ironing it on to the trailing edge with some excess to fold over each edge.  In the middle where the metal wire is for the aileron controls required some extra ‘fiddling’ to get the covering to fit right as needed to make a hole in the covering, slide the wire through and then figure out where the other hole needed to be made.  Then once done slip the wire through holes made in the covering and iron it to the wing.

On each end of the wing where the covering is folded over additional cuts were required to get a better look.

Building Seamaster Day 26: Sanding Paste

Sanded paste where balsa blocks meet fuse

On Aug 5th I did a fair bit of sanding touch ups on the wing, ailerons and fuselage.  This included sanding paste where balsa blocks meet the fuselage, seen above.  As well as some careful sanding of the paste on the trailing edge sheet and ailerons, seen below:

Ailerons touched up
Ailerons touched up
Trailing Edge touch ups
Trailing Edge touch ups

Yes, I know these last few posts have not been all that detailed; however, due to circumstances I am months behind on posts and am taking today to catch up so I at least have some sort of track record of when I did what. 🙂

Building Seamaster Day 25: Balsa blocks, keel, etc.

Keel glued to bottom of fuselage

On May 27th I saw some of the work Peter had done on the aircraft and put in some of my own work.  Peter had the keel glued to bottom of fuselage, seen above as well as the balsa blocks for the engine mount in place and formed with paste applied to fill the gaps.  I just had to do some more sanding of the touch up paste applied to give a smoother transition.

Balsa Blocks Formed
Balsa Blocks Formed

I worked on making a template for where the servo cables for controlling the ailerons are going to come out of the wing, join and then connect within the fuselage.

 

Building Seamaster Day 21: Wing Leading Edge Tips and Fin

Sculpting Leading Edge Wing Tips

On May 4th I worked on the wing and tail of the aircraft.

Seen above I worked on sanding the leading edge, specifically the wing tip corners to get the desired taper.

The fin of the aircraft is composed of two pieces, front and back.  I started by sanding off the ‘burnt’ finish from the laser cutting and then glued the two pieces together, pinned them to the board and placed weights on top to hold everything in place while the glue dried.  This is seen below, the wax paper is to ensure nothing gets stuck to any glue that oozes out that shouldn’t.

Fin Pieces Glued - Close Up
Fin Pieces Glued – Close Up
Fin Pieces Glued - Full
Fin Pieces Glued – Full

Building Seamaster Day 20: Wing Hold Down Bolts

Wing Bolts Fitting
Wing Bolts Fitting

On May 2nd we did a fitting of the wing into the fuselage and figured out where the wing hold down bolt holes needed to be drilled.  My first drill was a little off, which is why we do some test drills with a tiny bit to see where it lines up with the wing bolt down blocks glued into the fuselage.

Once happy with the angle and how everything will fit I drilled the hole with using a bigger bit right into the wing hold down blocks.  The final result can be seen in the picture above with the bolts started in the corresponding wholes to ensure they line up and will work.

Building Seamaster Day 16: Wing, Floats & Push Rods

Rounding of Leading Edge

On April 14th I did a fair bit of work on the wing and a little bit on the fuselage.

On the wing the supports were glued into place.  This is top and bottom for both wing tips and provides stability for the wing tip to prevent over flexing, etc.  You can tell in looking at the leading edge of the picture below followed by the leading edge in the featured image at the top that I rounded the leading edge to get the aerodynamics going.  This involved a lot of sanding.  Key here is to wrap the sand paper around the edge and work it back and forth pulling down and away from the edge back and forth to get the rounded effect desired.

Wing Tips Supports Installed
Wing Tips Supports Installed
Rounded Leading Edge
Rounded Leading Edge

 

This day I also glued the bottom, light balsa, of the floats to the sides.  Eventually the floats will be fiber glassed and special paint applied to make them water proof as these will be placed out on the wings for flotation in the water.

Glue Bottom of Floats
Glue Bottom of Floats

Making sure the push rods are long enough (and casing cut back to allow movement of the inner rod) for the rudder and elevator of the aircraft to where the servos are mounted.

Checking push rod length with servo location

Building Seamaster Day 13: Fuselage Nose & Wing

Supports and funky nose

On March 24th there was some good and some bad.  One of the bad’s can be seen above in that in shaping the nose it took on a ‘funky’ warping causing the one side to bow in.  You’ll see this better in a front on shot later.  Added some supports to the nose as well to help it keep its form.  The other bad, which has since been corrected, is that the joints for the top and bottom main spars didn’t glue down in place.  Suspect this is due to the waits shifting and not keeping things in place as they should have been.  This is obviously not good and thus Peter had to break the joints and glue them again in order to get the spars down into the slots in the rib.  This is needed for support and overall functionality.

Spar Glue Fail
Spar Glue Fail

Below you can see where I glued down some balsa blocks onto the bottom of the trailing edge sheet.  This is to provide some support, holding power, for the back of the hinges that will be holding the ailerons (and allowing for movement) to the trailing edge of the wing.

Glued Aileron Hinge Supports In Place
Glued Aileron Hinge Supports In Place

Building Seamaster Day 12: Fuse top & Wing Sheeting

Tail Top Glued

On March 21st I made some more progress on both the wing and the fuselage.

On the fuselage I got the top of the fuselage glued in place.  The wholes, that came pre-cut, are to trim weight from the overall aircraft.

In the photo below you can see where I glued the sheeting for the bottom centre of the wing into place.  It is flush with the trailing edge and spars.

Sheeting Bottom Centre of Wing
Sheeting Bottom Centre of Wing

Building Seamaster Day 11: Wing & Fuse Bottom

Gluing balsa pieces to make up the bottom of the fuselage tail end

On March 17th I got the main spar of one of the wing panels glued in place (seen below) and also got the sheeting glued to the bottom of the tail.  Used hardwood strips to provide a surface to hold the sheeting in place with clamps along the bottom edges of the side while the glue dries (seen in the top photo).  Used a round container, elastic’d in place, to mould the sheeting up under the front bottom plate (as there is a curve in the tail at this point).  Also clamped into place the plate for the tail wheel at the very back.

Gluing Main Spar
Gluing Main Spar

Building Seamaster Day 10: Fuse Nose + Wing Panel

Main Spar & Trailing Edge Glued

Well, do to life’s circumstances I have gotten very far behind on my blog posts for this project.  I’ve gotten married, bought a house, done a lot of painting and packing, moved into said house and have done a lot of unpacking and organising.  This meant that over the course of the Winter and Spring I haven’t been working on my aircraft as much as I would have normally and also started work on the aircraft a lot later than normal too.  So lets start by getting caught up on posts, even if due to the time lag they are not as high quality as they should be…

On March 14th I worked on the fuselage and the wing.  Seen in the picture above I glued the main spar for one of the wing panels in place and used a piece of wood I waited down on the trailing edges of the ribs to help ensure the ribs stayed at the correct angle while the glue dried.  I made sure there was excess wood on each side of the spar, which we can trim off at a later date, to make it easier to fit and adjust later.

Seen below we braced the front former’s in place and steamed the wood to do our best to get the wood to curve to the nose.

Unfortunately, since I know how all this goes, the fuse didn’t turn out as well as I would have liked; however, I’ve been informed it should still be flyable.  Stay tuned to find out what exactly I mean!

Steaming the front of the fuse to work in the curve to the nose
Steaming the front of the fuse to work in the curve to the nose