Tag Archives: Pylon

Building Seamaster Day 60: Tank Fit & Power Switch

Fiber-glass Casing

We were having an issue with getting the tank to fit in the fiber-glass housing along with some foam for protection to prevent it from raddling around.

On May 11th I did a trial fit of the tank, with the foam stuffed in, now that the engine is mounted, painted, etc. to make sure things were coming together as expected.

I also started prepping the switch I sanded off the piece of plastic that protrudes over the actual switch as well as drilled a hole into the switch itself due to how I need to rig it up and then cut out a rectangular piece of wood that will fit into the fuselage where I need the switch to be. I then measured where the center of the switch needed to be and cut out a hole about the dimensions of the switch back, sanding to finish the fit. I then put the switch through, back plate on the back, and screwed the two pieces together to secure the switch in place.

Switch
Switch

Building Seamaster Day 59: Sanding + Wing Tip Floats

Coming Together

May 8th I returned to sanding, in this case paint, as after painting the pylon I needed to do some sanding on the bottom portion in order for the pylon to fit back down into the slot on the fuselage. I sanded to the curve of the top of the fuselage to keep the better finish in visible areas.

You can see the plane coming together in the featured image at the top with the newly painted pylon fitted.

I also got the wing tip floats attached to the bottom of the wing. This invovled figuring out where the screws needed to go in order to match up to the previously installed balsa blocks in the wing to provide strentgh.

All together 3 screws were used. One to hold the front portion down, seen in the first pic below, and two to hold the back portion down.

Wing Tip Floats Attached
Wing Tip Floats Attached
Wing Tip Floats Attached Side View
Wing Tip Floats Attached Side View

Building Seamaster Day 56 & 58: Painting

Fuel Tank Assembled

April 28th, I painted the pylon and applied the base coat to the fiberglass cassing. I then went with yellow paint for the pylon to match the top color of the aircraft (wings and stab are yellow on top).

Pylon Base Painted
Pylon Base Painted

May 1st, I mixed up a batch of epoxy and attached the throttle servo assembly previously made to the pylon, using clamps to hold it in place while the glue set.

I then spray painted the fiberglass cassing it’s first coat of green paint. Prior to painting a piece of frog tape was wrapped around (darker green in the image below) so that after an appropriate amount of coats have been applied and the paint has dried the tape can be removed providing a white stripe to accentuate the piece.

The green was spray painted on so the encasing was placed over a ‘stick’ and clamped in a vise which was placed inside a cardboard box (with the one side cut out) to contain the paint. Rotating using the vise, periodically, to achieve an even finish… roughly 🙂

Building Seamaster Day 55: Pylon & Firewall

On March 23rd I worked on getting the firewall and pylon prepped to take the engine and the servo to control the throttle.

This involved gluing in a triangular piece for… as well as a rectangular light balsa block which is where the servo assembly is going to mount too. I took the measurements for the two pieces from Peter’s Seamaster, drew my measured lines on the wood, cut the pieces down to size using a table jigsaw and sanded where necessary.

Mounting Plate And Pylon
Mounting Plate And Pylon

On March 26th I continued getting the firewall ready by drilling holes in the firewall for the engine mounting brackets. Once the holes were drilled I installed the T-nuts. The steps to do this were:

  • Fill the center of the T-nuts with Vaseline
  • Apply glue inside the hole and on the back around the hole
  • Hammer in the T-nuts
  • Wipe away excess glue
  • Clamp and let dry

You can also see in the first picture below where added supports for the previously installed triangle piece was glued and is also now screwed into the firewall too.

Mounting Plate Drilled For Engine Mount Back
Mounting Plate Drilled For Engine Mount Back
Mounting Plate Drilled For Engine Mount
Mounting Plate Drilled For Engine Mount

Building Seamaster Day 4: Pylon and Side Meet

Gluing Pylon to Left Side

February 21st was about finishing off the Pylon and starting to get the fuselage sides attached.  The first step was ensuring the seems of where the spacers meet the formers are secure by applying a bead of medium CA glue long the seems.  This was done for all four areas, inside and out, making for eight beads of glue.

Medium CA Glue
Medium CA Glue

Glue Along Seems
Glue Along Seems

After that was done, this type of glue dries fast!  I did a trial fit of the pylon to each fuselage side.  While doing this I made a line along each side to determine where I needed to apply glue (seen below).  After that was done I placed glue along the left side of the pylon (ensuring sufficient glue on the tabs) as well as on the fuselage side and then put the pieces in place and clamped them together as seen in the picture at the top of the article.

Marking Glue Lines For Pylon Placement
Marking Glue Lines For Pylon Placement

That wrapped up another day as couldn’t go any further until this dried.  Once dried Peter did the same for the other side so that the project wasn’t held up to much as that needed to be done before anymore formers could be trial fitted and glued in place.

Building Seamaster Day 3: Pylon

Re-gluing the sides

Monday the 19th was a day of dang’s and backtracking before nicely getting ahead.  When I first got there and was working discovered that the sides of the fuselage hadn’t stuck together well enough.  Bad batch of glue!  That’s my story and I’m sticking to it… the only other evidence I have is that Peter tossed both parts for mixing it up and the fact they didn’t stick.

To rectify the sides coming apart I had to re-glue it (seen above) and thankfully this time it stuck!  Same process as before (without all the sanding), but unfortunately means not as much progress was made this day.  Also did a lot of sanding (John helped as well) due to the excess glue around the top of the doubler as you want to make sure the wing will sit nicely within the ‘saddle’.

What was suppose to be the main focus of this session was building the pylon, pictured below.  This is the main support for the fuselage and the engine mount (that will be above the aircraft mounted onto the piece of wood sticking out, plus other pieces I’ll get to later in the build).

For this I had to find the 4  pieces that make up the pylon (two of them are formers, F4 & F5).  The front is the smaller of the formers.  I then went to sanding the sides of all the pieces, followed by gluing the pieces that will help hold the main support for the engine (or so I’ll call it) and complete the pylon connecting F4 & F5.

Pylon with spacers all glued together
Pylon with spacers all glued together

That was it for this day as needed to wait for everything to dry before proceeding.  Also to make sure everything stuck together properly as well!