Tag Archives: Fuselage

Building Seamaster Day 30: Sanding & Covering Tail/Stab

Rounded Stab Leading Edge

Yesterday started with seeing what Peter had down, which was installed the hinges for the ailerons onto the trailing edge of the wing.  This involved making a two toothpick sized wholes per hinge as well as drilling a hole for the toothpick into the hinge itself.  Then the hinges were glued inside the slot with the toothpicks pushed through the pre-drilled holes.  This was done to provide greater strength to the hinges to help prevent them from disengaging from the trailing edge of the wing during flight.  Upon my arrival to complete the process I cut off the excess toothpick ends and then sanded the ends to be flush with the trailing edge sheet.

Hinges Tooth-picked and Glued Into Place
Hinges Tooth-picked and Glued Into Place

This day involved the most sanding I’ve done in a while as I touched up spots on the fuselage in the fin areas and then in rounding the leading edge of the stabilizer, seen in the image at the top of the post.

The fuselage of my aircraft is going to be white, like on my previous build.  Essentially I am trying to standardise my colour scheme so no matter which aircraft I am flying top and bottom colours will be the same (exception to this may be when I get into real world models, i.e. Thunderbolt or P51 Mustang, and want to be true to the aircraft.  That is why, seen below, I did the trailing edge of the fin in white and then slit the covering where it covers the 3 hinge slots.  For simplicity due to the stab/tail design I ran the white right up and over the top.  This pieces still requires some touch up before proceeding with covering the tail end.

Covered Trailing Edge of Fuselage
Covered Trailing Edge of Fuselage

Building Seamaster Day 26: Sanding Paste

Sanded paste where balsa blocks meet fuse

On Aug 5th I did a fair bit of sanding touch ups on the wing, ailerons and fuselage.  This included sanding paste where balsa blocks meet the fuselage, seen above.  As well as some careful sanding of the paste on the trailing edge sheet and ailerons, seen below:

Ailerons touched up
Ailerons touched up
Trailing Edge touch ups
Trailing Edge touch ups

Yes, I know these last few posts have not been all that detailed; however, due to circumstances I am months behind on posts and am taking today to catch up so I at least have some sort of track record of when I did what. 🙂

Building Seamaster Day 25: Balsa blocks, keel, etc.

Keel glued to bottom of fuselage

On May 27th I saw some of the work Peter had done on the aircraft and put in some of my own work.  Peter had the keel glued to bottom of fuselage, seen above as well as the balsa blocks for the engine mount in place and formed with paste applied to fill the gaps.  I just had to do some more sanding of the touch up paste applied to give a smoother transition.

Balsa Blocks Formed
Balsa Blocks Formed

I worked on making a template for where the servo cables for controlling the ailerons are going to come out of the wing, join and then connect within the fuselage.

 

Building Seamaster Day 22: Fin to Fuselage

On May 5th I glued the fin to the tail of the fuselage.  I used some triangle stock to run along each side of the fin.  This is glued to both the fin and fuselage to provide added support to the fin.  Made sure the triangle stock was a bit longer on each end to give me some to work with later for the tapering, etc.

Everything was then clamped and mostly pinned into place while the glue dried.

Fin with Supports Glued
Fin with Supports Glued

Building Seamaster Day 20: Wing Hold Down Bolts

Wing Bolts Fitting
Wing Bolts Fitting

On May 2nd we did a fitting of the wing into the fuselage and figured out where the wing hold down bolt holes needed to be drilled.  My first drill was a little off, which is why we do some test drills with a tiny bit to see where it lines up with the wing bolt down blocks glued into the fuselage.

Once happy with the angle and how everything will fit I drilled the hole with using a bigger bit right into the wing hold down blocks.  The final result can be seen in the picture above with the bolts started in the corresponding wholes to ensure they line up and will work.

Building Seamaster Day 19: Sanding, sanding, sanding

Float Structure Complete

On April 20th finished off the floats and worked on sculpting the nose of the aircraft.  In the case of the floats seen above I sanded the edges of the top sheeting I glued on previously.    I sanded the edges of the sheeting to be flush with the sides of the float.

To continue with the theme of sanding I did a lot of sanding on the block of wood I previously glued to the nose of the aircraft.  I marked some reference points on the wood, grabbed some sand paper and went at it for the evening getting my dose of cellulose that evening working.  The goal was to follow the lines of the fuselage and sculpt the nose accordingly with an added dip near the end of the top of the nose, seen below, as well as a gradual incline up from the bottom of the nose seen in the picture at the bottom of this post.  You can also tell there was more sanding done on the sides of the nose piece as well to give the final look seen in the pics below.

Carving Nose Top View
Carving Nose Top View
Carving Nose Bottom View
Carving Nose Bottom View

Building Seamaster Day 18: Float Tops & Nose

Nose Sculpting

On April 19th I completed the ‘wood’ version of the floats (still needs to be fiber glassed, etc.) and worked on the nose of the fuselage.  In order to do the floats I measured out a bunch of light balsa to glue to the top side of the float sides to make up the top of the floats.  These were glued along the top edge as well as the front and back edges of top pieces where it made sense.

I also started sculpting the balsa block which will make the  nose of the aircraft.

Float Tops Glued
Float Tops Glued

Building Seamaster Day 17: Floats to Nose

Nose Sculpting and Gluing

On April 18th I worked on the floats and got a hard piece of wood glued to the back of the floats which will be used for screwing to the bottom of the wing, holding the back in place.  There will also be a screw going through the front of the float as well.

Plate for attaching back of float to wing
Plate for attaching back of float to wing

As seen in the top pic I glued the nose to the front of the aircraft.  It is nowhere near done yet.  This started with a square piece of wood that I templated and then cut down to size as best I could using a table jigsaw and perhaps even some sanding at this point with the knowledge that I lot more sanding was on the horizon!  The piece was then glued to the flat nose of the fuselage and clamped into place while it dries for next time.

John mentioned something yesterday in that his needed a lot of counter weight and that it would be good to hollow out the nose so that weights could be attached in there.  To late for that now, so will be interesting to see what happens when it comes time to do the final balance of the aircraft.

Building Seamaster Day 16: Wing, Floats & Push Rods

Rounding of Leading Edge

On April 14th I did a fair bit of work on the wing and a little bit on the fuselage.

On the wing the supports were glued into place.  This is top and bottom for both wing tips and provides stability for the wing tip to prevent over flexing, etc.  You can tell in looking at the leading edge of the picture below followed by the leading edge in the featured image at the top that I rounded the leading edge to get the aerodynamics going.  This involved a lot of sanding.  Key here is to wrap the sand paper around the edge and work it back and forth pulling down and away from the edge back and forth to get the rounded effect desired.

Wing Tips Supports Installed
Wing Tips Supports Installed
Rounded Leading Edge
Rounded Leading Edge

 

This day I also glued the bottom, light balsa, of the floats to the sides.  Eventually the floats will be fiber glassed and special paint applied to make them water proof as these will be placed out on the wings for flotation in the water.

Glue Bottom of Floats
Glue Bottom of Floats

Making sure the push rods are long enough (and casing cut back to allow movement of the inner rod) for the rudder and elevator of the aircraft to where the servos are mounted.

Checking push rod length with servo location

Building Seamaster Day 15: Fuselage Bottom + Wing Tips

On April 12th I worked on the wing and the fuselage.  I glued the bottom mid-section of the fuselage in place which involved using glue along the edges to hold it to the fuselage as well as along the front edge to hold the bottom the flat surface it butts up against in the front.  It is then clamped and held in place while it dries.

Gluing Fuse Bottom
Gluing Fuse Bottom

As seen in the two pictures below I glued the two balsa wing tip forms into place.  There is glue along the straight left edge of the wing tip form to adhere it to the side of the outer rib as well as on the wood pieces where it is sliding between on the front and back of the wing.  This is to ensure it is glued into place and is being held by clamps while the glue dries.

Gluing Balsa L Tip Form
Gluing Balsa L Tip Form
Gluing Balsa Tip Form
Gluing Balsa R Tip Form